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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and today worries about supplies sent energy prices rising. oil jumps 2.3%, not a huge price, but enough that you might see a bit of an increase in gasoline and home-heating prices in the next ten days or so. the effect was more dramatic on natural gas prices in europe. america's natural gas is.com nesticly produced so the u.s. is not effected directly by prices in europe. but a sharp and sustained prize in energy prices in europe would raise the unlikely but scary possibility of europe's fragile economy being pushed back into recession that could deal a direct blow to u.s. companies, investors and consumers. calls for sanctions are increasing. sanctions worked against libya and iran, but russia is closely tied to europe through those pipelines that carry crucial natural gas, so while the idea may appeal to americans, they are a harder sell in europe. the european union gets a quarter of its natural gas supplies from russia and half of that is routed through ukraine's pipeline network. any disruption would hit germany which defends on the gas to run its factories, especially hard. and if
by the russians, it has become more of a geopolitical issue. in that sense it raises the stakes in both energy prices and other risks. we might see energy prices go up. a good chunk of europe's gas supply come from russia. and if that is at risk, they could be cut off. >> when we talk about emerging markets many include russia in places where you can invest and get a very high return. iin the risk of that country suffers, they may pull back from the united states. we're talking about crimea who are holding a referendum for greater autonomy. it's a greater impact. i don't think the impact will be that great. >> there is the ethical, moral issues involved whether or not they should help the ukraine. but as far as the economic connection, you think its simpler? >> i think if the intention thes flare-up between russia and u.s. and they're start to go, and they're pushed into a corner by the u.s. and aid by the european union, there could be an impact on the global energy crisis. >> let me ask you a question. we mentioned last month china with that bad economic report and then run on currency, peop
and energy. with an infrastructure bank they would solicit money from the private sector and guarantee loans, it's a joint public private model used by many, smacking of socialism to republicans in congress. america continues to suffer because of a lack of leadership on the issue. the concept of that national infrastructure bank is not new, but proposals to create one are gauging traction among lawmakers. we are spoke to the think tank focussed on public policy, asking why is it a good idea to turn the idea into reality. >> we have invested for too long in infrastructure, and as a result we see tension between the need to expand the system to meet increased demand, growing population, trade. governors and state departments face a paradox of needing to invest in the old system to ensure it's in a state of good repair and making critical new investments to grow the economy and provide opportunities for the citizens. >> i guess the issue is if you don't have the money to start with you are not maintenance, you can't get your head around the new stuff. i guess the al-qaeda any is if you don't ha
on for weeks and 18 people have died. venezuela is rich in energy but poor in necessities like milk. david will help explain the sometimes complex relationship between our two countries. >> david? >> this is venezuela's largest port city. we have refineries behind us and it's areas like these that are critical to venezuela's future. the influence in the region is wielded through petroleum. we talk about protests. we talk about high stakes in region where there is much natural gas and much crude oil. this is in many ways is why what happens in venezuela is so important. oil. venezuela is the fourth largest supplier of crude oil to the united states behind canada, saudi arabia and mexico, and has the largest reverse in th resere world. but because it does not have an refineries an unlikely partnership has emerged from the united states and this south american nation. >> years ago even under hue go chavez, when he's talking about our being the devil or some of these rhetorical positions, the bottom line is that the united states is the closest largest market for venezuelan oil. >> and the u.
, traders bid the price of crude oil up and that price shows up in higher gasoline prices and energy costs, and that's what hits americans. >> that ultimately whether you feel it directly or not has an impact on economic growth as a whole. what is your general sense as we're going into 2014, what is your general sense of how we're equipped in the united states to deal with economic shock? is this going to look like a year where things settle down? we've seen housing numbers were strong in 2013. but we're not sure how it will do in 2014. >> venezuela, brazil, chile argentina are all part of the developing country world, the emerging markets. there are large number of them that we think russia has got problems, turkey is in similar situation to argentina and venezuela politically and economically, and in a couple of countries in asia are affected as well. that effects investments. so all together about 15% of global gdp can get dented by worsening situations in the countries that i've named. and that's enough to dent global growth to interfere and be a pediment to stronger global and u.s. ec
in 2011 establishing a bank that leverages private funds for transportation, water and energy. with an infrastructure bank the federal government would identify big projects in the public interest visit mon from the private sector and guarantee the loan it's a joint public private model used by many countries around the world but smacks too much of the socialism to many republicans in congress. in the meantime american continues to sufferer because i've lack of leadership on this issue you. a concept of a national infrastructure bank isn't new but pro* proposals to create one are gaining traction among law makers, am see spoke with kevin from the center of american progress a progressive think tank focused on policy and asked why now is a good time to turn the idea in a reality. >> for far too long we have under invested in infrastructure and as a result of that, we see this tension between the need to expand our system to meet increased travel demand, growing population, increased international trade, and so governors and many state departments and transportation face a parad
she's not alone. >> hopefully put good energy. >> this club has been around for more than a year and several dozen former members are now working. >> how job clubs can help you, log onto our website, aljazeera.com/realmoney. >>> milmill millennials, writtey a millennial. david, why do you think there's so many highly jeacted millennials looking for work? >> the fact that millennials coming out of college are not prepared to fit the needs of the economy. those really trnt kinds of jobs that millennials wand. they want to find meaningful work, they've just gone through this college experience where they have been exploring these ideas and we have a big challenge to fill those jobs and the second piece is that millennials are not willing to take any job they want. this is a generation who say they would rather take a job that pays less that has more social impact than a job where they don't feel they have that kind of impact. they would rather sit it out in some cases than go take that job. good is it possible that the minimum enial generation has some sort of attitude problem? ther
's overreliance on energy exports. these two countries are home to plenty of rich people. plenty of billionaires, but that was not always the case. back in 2004 forbes reported that russia had 25 billion narrows and ukraine had none. ten years later forbes said russian has 111 billion narrows and ukraine has nine. the u.s. and china have the world's most billion narrows. all this information and more is in the forbes world billion narrows issue out this week. joining me to talk about those on the list, cary, good to see you. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having me. >> ologarts suggest a small number of people who control a large part of the economy. >> and in russia and ukraine, you have billionaire ologarts. but not so in other places in the world. >> in america you could be a billionaire and not have an influence on anything but where you spend your money. when you look at some of these unstable economies where two decades ago people were living in troubled times in a centrally controlled economy, how do you end up up with these billion narrows? how did they get there? >> it's
investment to fund massive public works across the country in transportation, water and energy. with an infrastructure bank, this has been used in other parts of the world, the federal government would identify big projects, solicit money from the private sector and guarantee the loans required to execute those projects. it's a joint public-private model used by many countries around the world, but smack too much of socialism to many people in congress. in the meantime, america continues to suffer because of lack of leadership on this issue. this idea of creating international bank is not new. but proposals to create one is gaining traction among lawmakers because strong infrastructure boosts productivity, innovation and public well-being. creating a natural infrastructure bank is only part of the solution, kevin, let's talk about that part of the solution. the reason why you said it's part of the solution. you say infrastructure banks are useful for new big projects. if you want to fund the national high rail system or dam, but it's not for maintenance, which you think is the
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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